IntoTemptation…..jewellery musings

Thoughts on jewelry, accessories and whatever else takes my fancy

Archive for the month “March, 2017”

Jewel of the day: Faberge Diamond Enamel Gold Pendant

I don’t think I’ve ever seen a Faberge piece that was as streamlined as this, with a bloomed gold finish. Etsy seller Romanov Russia.com explains, “Made by Faberge Moscow branch between 1899 and 1908. The matte gold pendant is designed as a triangular shaped gold plaque with rounded corners (resembles kokoshnik, a traditional Russian head-dress worn by women and girls) with an openwork flying stork caring a diamond. The wings of the stork accented with rose-cut diamonds and a ruby.
The lower border of the plaque is decorated with four appliques engraved with diagonal lines and covered with translucent blue and golden enamel, apparently, to resemble a cloudy sky. The two enameled triangular side drops imitate Old-Slavonic kolts (pendants attached to a female head-dress). 22 old brilliant cut and 4 rose cut diamonds. Estimated total diamond weight 3 carats. Height 2 3/4 in. (7 cm)

The central flexible drop with bezel-set diamonds is flanked by two triangular drops which are covered with aquamarine blue enamel with golden shades. Marked on rim with 56 zolotnik old Russian gold standard (14K) with initials of the Moscow assay master Ivan Lebedkin, and ‘ KФ ‘ in Cyrillic for Carl Faberge. The detachable suspension ring is struck with assay mark and assayer’s initials of Ivan Lebedkin.”

This piece sells for USD$25,000.

 

Jewel of the day: Bentley & Skinner Edwardian Diamond Tiara

Nothing says aristocracy quite like a tiara. This one is Edwardian, and offered for sale by London-based Bentley & Skinner. They describe it as, “An Edwardian diamond tiara, with foliate swags and floral motifs graduating from the centre, set with old brilliant-cut and rose-cut diamonds estimated to weigh a total of 8 carats, all to a yellow gold mount with detachable frame, (convertible into a necklace or coronet), circa 1900, gross weight 69.68 grams.”

Should you have a glam, tiara appropriate event to attend (though you could just wear it as a necklace), this will set you back£46,500.

Jewel of the day: Voz Jewelry May the Bridges I Burn Necklace

Voz Jewelry has twisted an old adage and turned it into a quirky pendant. They’ve stamped, “May the bridges I burn light the way” onto dog tags you can wear to showcase your own independent spirit.

These are available in either brass or aluminum with an 18 inch chain. They sell for USD$27.

 

Jewel of the day: The Pink Star Diamond

Pink diamonds have always been a rarity (as are other naturally coloured diamonds) but they really became lodged in the public’s imagination when Jennifer Lopez received a pink diamond engagement ring from Ben Affleck. That didn’t go anywhere and in fact, the initial sale of this diamond a few years ago also fizzled when the buyer couldn’t come up with the nearly $88 million asking price. The seller left happy, as Sotheby’s had guaranteed a $60 million hammer price, which was paid out regardless of the incomplete sale.

This stone is back on the block (somewhat like JLo herself) and will once again go under the Sotheby’s hammer, this time on April 4 in Hong Kong. Sotheby’s explains, ”

Meticulously cut by Steinmetz Diamonds over a period of nearly two years – a process in which the 132.50 carat rough was cast in epoxy more than 50 times in order to create models upon which the design team could experiment with different cuts -it was transformed into this spectacular 59.60 carat, fancy vivid pink, internally flawless oval cut gem – the largest internally flawless or flawless, fancy vivid pink diamond that the Gemological Institute of America (GIA) has ever graded.

The diamond was first unveiled to the public in May 2003 as the ‘Steinmetz Pink’, and was modelled by Helena Christensen at a dedicated event thrown to coincide with the Monaco Grand Prix. Writing in the Financial Times on the 31 May 2003, Mike Duff described the diamond as “the rarest, finest, most precious stone the world has ever seen”. The stone was first sold in 2007 and was subsequently renamed “The Pink Star”. In the same article, Tom Moses, Executive Vice President and Chief Laboratory and Research Officer of the GIA, is quoted as saying: “it’s our experience that large polished pink diamonds – over ten carats – very rarely occur with an intense colour… The GIA Laboratory has been issuing grading reports for 50 years and this is the largest pink diamond with this depth of colour [vivid pink] that we have ever characterised”.

Of all fancy coloured pink diamonds, those graded ‘Fancy Vivid’ are the most precious and desirable. The current world auction record for a pink diamond is the Graff Pink, a superb 24.78 carat diamond which sold at Sotheby’s Geneva in November 2010 for US$46.16 million. Weighing in at 59.60 carats and graded as Fancy Vivid, the Pink Star is twice the size.

In the summer of 2003, this amazing gem was exhibited at ‘The Splendor of Diamonds’ exhibition at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in Washington, DC. Displayed in the Winston Gallery alongside the 45.52 carat blue Hope Diamond, the exhibition featured seven of the world’s rarest and most extraordinary diamonds. Also on view for the first time in the United States was the 203.04 carat De Beers Millennium Star, one of the largest diamonds in the world; the Heart of Eternity blue diamond; the Moussaieff Red, the largest known red diamond in the world; the Harry Winston Pumpkin Diamond; the Allnatt, one of the world’s largest yellow diamonds at 101.29 carats; and the Ocean Dream, the world’s largest naturally occurring blue-green diamond.

Commenting at the opening of the exhibition, Dr. Jeffrey Post, curator of the Gems and Minerals Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History said, “Each of the diamonds is the finest of its kind and together with the museum’s gem collection makes for an exhibit of truly historic proportions”. In the three months the exhibition ran, the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History attracted more than 1.6 million visitors.

From July through November 2005, The Pink Star again took centre stage, this time at the ‘Diamonds’ exhibition held at the Natural History Museum, in London. “This exhibition will bring together many of the most impressive single stones in the world, fascinating science, and insights into the diamond industry to tell the story of diamonds from deep in the Earth to the red carpet,” said Michael Dixon, director of the Natural History Museum. For five months, the dazzling exhibition attracted approximately 70,000 visitors a day.”

The estimate is available upon request.

Jewel of the day: 66Mint Fancy Yellow Diamond Ring

Though 66Mint touts itself as a destination for vintage pieces, this lovely ring looks fairly contemporary to me. There is nothing in the description to indicate otherwise, I don’t think: “Natural fancy yellow marquise cut diamond for 1.04ct, accented by 34 round brilliant cut diamonds for a total approximate weight of 0.36cts in an exclusive platinum and 18Kt yellow gold Sebastien Barier custom design ring. The color in this natural fancy diamond is evenly distributed. The ring is a size 6.75 and weighs 3.8 grams. GIA report #6157800718 is included.”

Jewel of the day: Debra Adelson Tidal Pool Cuff Bracelet

Jeweller Debra Adelson specializes in pieces which incorporate glass, to lovely effect. This Tidal Pool Bracelet has carved glass as its centrepiece, set in sterling silver and accented with white topaz stones. This is a one-of-a-kind piece. Contact Adelson re price and other for sale items.

 

Jewel of the day: Love, Lisa Barbed Wire Choker

Chokers show no sign of flattening out as a trend, and this one has a tiny twist: a barbed wire design. By Love, Lisa, it is 6″ with a gunmetal lobster clasp closure set with black stones. The charm shown must be purchased separately (but it does look very cool with this piece). The necklace alone sells for USD$74.

 

Jewel of the day: Jewelyrie Eclipse Earrings

I’m liking the curb chain motif in these earrings, made lighter with the blue hue of the tanzanite stone. By Jewelyrie, these “tanzanite, diamond and 18k white gold post earrings from Huan Wang’s Eclipse collection convey an amalgamation of beautiful contrasts imagined from the illumination of space, from the intricate metalwork to the rich prismatic of Tanzanite centre piece. Featuring the signature Eclipse composition of infinity twist halo encircled Tanzanite centre stone that hosts eight twinkling diamonds, accompanied by a rimmed texture disc.”

These sell for USD$1,320 and there are matching pieces in this design.

Jewel of the day: Ruben Loves Me Ballerz Classic Drop Earrings

Yeah, that’s a mouthful. But these are fun, practical everyday earrings offered by Ruben Loves Me. They note they are made, “with a 14mm exquisitely selected round gemball that is cradled in handcrafted silver or oxidized silver. Each side has a round cabochon that stems from a curved ear wire.” They are made with blue/black tiger eye and an Arizona turquoise cabochon in sterling silver.

These sell for USD$216.

Jewel of the day: Ilgaz Fazulzyanov Swallows Under Rain Pendant

Ilgaz Fazulzyanov is a Russia-based jeweller who does exquisite enamel work. Available in the UK through Annoushka Ducas (who founded and then sold Links of London before starting her eponymous line), these truly are collector pieces.

This pendant is described as: Four soaring swallows hand painted in vibrant blue and beige vitreous enamel caught in a diamond embellished downpour of 3.45 carat and 0.34 carat sapphire. Hand set with 527 stones, this exclusive pendant will be exhibited for the first time since its debut in the Moscow Kremlin. Available to view and buy at Annoushka’s Cadogan Gardens boutique between 4-15 October 2016. For enquiries, please contact customerservices@annoushka.com. Matching Swallows Under Rain Earrings available too.”

This sells for £38,800.

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